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Mental Health Services

Counseling Services Offered:

One-on-one counseling can be helpful for times when you are dealing with specific, intense, and/or longer-term mental health concerns. Individual counseling is typically something you are referred for and can be a supportive supplement to involvement in group counseling endeavors. Individual counseling is limited to 6-sessions/semester and can be used as a gateway to getting you connected with a local provider who is able to offer support for years to come.

Counseling in a group environment is thought to be extremely effective because peer-to-peer engagement in a highly supportive and safe environment allows participants the room to relate, respond, revise, and evolve. Working alongside others helps to engender mindsets which are empathetic, inclusive, and promote mutual-growth opportunities. You will find group promotion around campus and I encourage you to ask about current offerings. Go group!

What does depression look like? What are tools for managing anxiety? How does trauma impact the brain? Psychoeducation does exactly what the word implies – it provides education around human psychology. Psychoeducation is helpful and effective in providing us a framework for better understanding our own and others’ mental health processes. It constructs a foundation for greater acceptance of ourselves and our world. Be on the lookout for trainings and workshops. Stop by anytime with questions and feedback!

Where on Campus can you find our Counselor?

This room is great for introductions, casual conversations, asking/answering basic questions, condom distribution, and psychoeducation resources. This room does not guarantee confidentiality and will therefore not be used for individual sessions.

This room’s location is discrete and tucked away, making it a great setting for individual sessions where privacy is requisite. 

This room is large and open, allowing space for group counseling and group-based activities. It should be noted that this room is not ADA accessible. Please contact Sarah Droege, Otero College Mental Health Counselor, if the accessibility of this room is a concern so that accommodations can be made.

How do I schedule an appointment?

Schedule an appointment by email, in person, over the phone or by using Navigate. You can find Sarah Droege's contact info listed below.

Additional Resources

Local Mental Health Referrals & Resources (pdf)

Concerned about a student, faculty or staff member? (pdf)

About Sarah Droege, MA, LPC

Hi! My name is Sarah and I am Otero College’s Mental Health Counselor. I never planned to work in the mental health field. In fact, I was pretty certain I wanted to go into politics. So I finished a Bachelor’s in International Affairs and moved to Washington, D.C. I was working one city block from the White House.

And I hated it.

My life had never felt that narrow. So I left. Like really left. I joined the United States Peace Corps and spent the next several years in Kenya and Tanzania. In Kenya I learned humility. I learned to take care of myself. I learned my ceiling. And I smashed up against that sucker every single day.

While serving, I was given the privilege of providing group counseling support to HIV-positive individuals living in my village. Did I know what I was doing? HECK no. Did I give it my all? You better believe it. By the end of my stay I knew what my next step would be: I needed to return to school. I needed to become a therapist.

Upon my return I attended the University of Northern Colorado in Greeley for my Master’s in Clinical Mental Health Counseling and am now a practicing Licensed Professional Counselor in the state of Colorado. I have worked in a variety of settings and with diverse populations. Some of the mental health concerns which have been emphasized in my work include intersectionality and identity, living LGBTQIA, substance use, incarceration and community transitions, multicultural challenges, and chronic illness, along with diagnoses such as major depression, generalized anxiety, bipolar I/II, posttraumatic stress, eating disorders, schizophrenia, and various substance use disorders.

Although I have worked with individuals across the gender spectrum, a significant percentage of my clientele have identified as male and I am a HUGE advocate for men seeking therapy. As a consequence of antiquated social constructs and harmful gender-based expectations, males are typically underserved when it comes to mental health. I find this unacceptable. Join me in breaking the stigma. Join me in normalizing healthy living across the gender spectrum.

So that’s me. Let’s add you to the equation. What can our work together look like? What kind of programming can you seek out?

 

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